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Getting started as a bitcoin cash merchant

So I've spent some time looking into various APIs and services, trying to get a basic merchant setup working usable for development, with a working testnet. The quality of the services offered and documentation is lacking, to say the least.
So I've taken a step back and decided I would try to get this working from "first principles", basically setting up a node and using the related APIs. I first tried the BCHD node which was looking promising, until the testnet version of it got into a loop where it kept complaining about some invalid transactions over and over and never seemed to recover.
The I tried "Bitcoin Cash Node", which is an awful name for search engines btw. It could really need a more unique and searchable name. After some struggle and careful reading of startup options and configuration files, I managed to get nodes up an running (testnet and mainnet) and in such a state that they answer to REST and JSONRPC calls.
I have transferred some bitcoin on testnet to a know address, using a public "faucet" that works (also a bit hard to find). I know that I managed to get that part working, as I've successfully looked up the balance of that address using a few of the public blockchain lookup tools.
What I havent' quite figured out is how to look up that address on my locally running node. Most of the API deals with transactions, not addresses. There aren't many APIs that accept addresses. scantxoutset might work, but it uses terms as "scan", which indicates it's not a "low cost" operation (which I would expect).
So I'm wondering, does this really mean that most bitcoin nodes really isn't usable for looking up addresses?? Or to turn it around, can anybody recommend bitcoin cash nodes that offers an easy to use API for looking up payment related things, like addresses?
Final note, I know how wallets etc work. The reason I'm trying to implement similar functionality from scratch is to understand all the details. And because a merchant typically can't just accept the current limited functionality with wallets, which seems focused on a single user's need, not what a merchant would need (gap issue etc).
And fwiw, I've also tested the "bitbox" API (which does not have a working testnet) and "fullstack" API (which has a working testnet, although documentation isn't complete). So I know about other ways of doing similar stuff. I'm just trying to minimize the number of external things I need to depend on while also figuring out how this can be done straight from running nodes.
submitted by kjeldahl to btc [link] [comments]

Why i’m bullish on Zilliqa (long read)

Edit: TL;DR added in the comments
 
Hey all, I've been researching coins since 2017 and have gone through 100s of them in the last 3 years. I got introduced to blockchain via Bitcoin of course, analyzed Ethereum thereafter and from that moment I have a keen interest in smart contact platforms. I’m passionate about Ethereum but I find Zilliqa to have a better risk-reward ratio. Especially because Zilliqa has found an elegant balance between being secure, decentralized and scalable in my opinion.
 
Below I post my analysis of why from all the coins I went through I’m most bullish on Zilliqa (yes I went through Tezos, EOS, NEO, VeChain, Harmony, Algorand, Cardano etc.). Note that this is not investment advice and although it's a thorough analysis there is obviously some bias involved. Looking forward to what you all think!
 
Fun fact: the name Zilliqa is a play on ‘silica’ silicon dioxide which means “Silicon for the high-throughput consensus computer.”
 
This post is divided into (i) Technology, (ii) Business & Partnerships, and (iii) Marketing & Community. I’ve tried to make the technology part readable for a broad audience. If you’ve ever tried understanding the inner workings of Bitcoin and Ethereum you should be able to grasp most parts. Otherwise, just skim through and once you are zoning out head to the next part.
 
Technology and some more:
 
Introduction
 
The technology is one of the main reasons why I’m so bullish on Zilliqa. First thing you see on their website is: “Zilliqa is a high-performance, high-security blockchain platform for enterprises and next-generation applications.” These are some bold statements.
 
Before we deep dive into the technology let’s take a step back in time first as they have quite the history. The initial research paper from which Zilliqa originated dates back to August 2016: Elastico: A Secure Sharding Protocol For Open Blockchains where Loi Luu (Kyber Network) is one of the co-authors. Other ideas that led to the development of what Zilliqa has become today are: Bitcoin-NG, collective signing CoSi, ByzCoin and Omniledger.
 
The technical white paper was made public in August 2017 and since then they have achieved everything stated in the white paper and also created their own open source intermediate level smart contract language called Scilla (functional programming language similar to OCaml) too.
 
Mainnet is live since the end of January 2019 with daily transaction rates growing continuously. About a week ago mainnet reached 5 million transactions, 500.000+ addresses in total along with 2400 nodes keeping the network decentralized and secure. Circulating supply is nearing 11 billion and currently only mining rewards are left. The maximum supply is 21 billion with annual inflation being 7.13% currently and will only decrease with time.
 
Zilliqa realized early on that the usage of public cryptocurrencies and smart contracts were increasing but decentralized, secure, and scalable alternatives were lacking in the crypto space. They proposed to apply sharding onto a public smart contract blockchain where the transaction rate increases almost linear with the increase in the amount of nodes. More nodes = higher transaction throughput and increased decentralization. Sharding comes in many forms and Zilliqa uses network-, transaction- and computational sharding. Network sharding opens up the possibility of using transaction- and computational sharding on top. Zilliqa does not use state sharding for now. We’ll come back to this later.
 
Before we continue dissecting how Zilliqa achieves such from a technological standpoint it’s good to keep in mind that a blockchain being decentralised and secure and scalable is still one of the main hurdles in allowing widespread usage of decentralised networks. In my opinion this needs to be solved first before blockchains can get to the point where they can create and add large scale value. So I invite you to read the next section to grasp the underlying fundamentals. Because after all these premises need to be true otherwise there isn’t a fundamental case to be bullish on Zilliqa, right?
 
Down the rabbit hole
 
How have they achieved this? Let’s define the basics first: key players on Zilliqa are the users and the miners. A user is anybody who uses the blockchain to transfer funds or run smart contracts. Miners are the (shard) nodes in the network who run the consensus protocol and get rewarded for their service in Zillings (ZIL). The mining network is divided into several smaller networks called shards, which is also referred to as ‘network sharding’. Miners subsequently are randomly assigned to a shard by another set of miners called DS (Directory Service) nodes. The regular shards process transactions and the outputs of these shards are eventually combined by the DS shard as they reach consensus on the final state. More on how these DS shards reach consensus (via pBFT) will be explained later on.
 
The Zilliqa network produces two types of blocks: DS blocks and Tx blocks. One DS Block consists of 100 Tx Blocks. And as previously mentioned there are two types of nodes concerned with reaching consensus: shard nodes and DS nodes. Becoming a shard node or DS node is being defined by the result of a PoW cycle (Ethash) at the beginning of the DS Block. All candidate mining nodes compete with each other and run the PoW (Proof-of-Work) cycle for 60 seconds and the submissions achieving the highest difficulty will be allowed on the network. And to put it in perspective: the average difficulty for one DS node is ~ 2 Th/s equaling 2.000.000 Mh/s or 55 thousand+ GeForce GTX 1070 / 8 GB GPUs at 35.4 Mh/s. Each DS Block 10 new DS nodes are allowed. And a shard node needs to provide around 8.53 GH/s currently (around 240 GTX 1070s). Dual mining ETH/ETC and ZIL is possible and can be done via mining software such as Phoenix and Claymore. There are pools and if you have large amounts of hashing power (Ethash) available you could mine solo.
 
The PoW cycle of 60 seconds is a peak performance and acts as an entry ticket to the network. The entry ticket is called a sybil resistance mechanism and makes it incredibly hard for adversaries to spawn lots of identities and manipulate the network with these identities. And after every 100 Tx Blocks which corresponds to roughly 1,5 hour this PoW process repeats. In between these 1,5 hour, no PoW needs to be done meaning Zilliqa’s energy consumption to keep the network secure is low. For more detailed information on how mining works click here.
Okay, hats off to you. You have made it this far. Before we go any deeper down the rabbit hole we first must understand why Zilliqa goes through all of the above technicalities and understand a bit more what a blockchain on a more fundamental level is. Because the core of Zilliqa’s consensus protocol relies on the usage of pBFT (practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance) we need to know more about state machines and their function. Navigate to Viewblock, a Zilliqa block explorer, and just come back to this article. We will use this site to navigate through a few concepts.
 
We have established that Zilliqa is a public and distributed blockchain. Meaning that everyone with an internet connection can send ZILs, trigger smart contracts, etc. and there is no central authority who fully controls the network. Zilliqa and other public and distributed blockchains (like Bitcoin and Ethereum) can also be defined as state machines.
 
Taking the liberty of paraphrasing examples and definitions given by Samuel Brooks’ medium article, he describes the definition of a blockchain (like Zilliqa) as: “A peer-to-peer, append-only datastore that uses consensus to synchronize cryptographically-secure data”.
 
Next, he states that: "blockchains are fundamentally systems for managing valid state transitions”. For some more context, I recommend reading the whole medium article to get a better grasp of the definitions and understanding of state machines. Nevertheless, let’s try to simplify and compile it into a single paragraph. Take traffic lights as an example: all its states (red, amber, and green) are predefined, all possible outcomes are known and it doesn’t matter if you encounter the traffic light today or tomorrow. It will still behave the same. Managing the states of a traffic light can be done by triggering a sensor on the road or pushing a button resulting in one traffic lights’ state going from green to red (via amber) and another light from red to green.
 
With public blockchains like Zilliqa, this isn’t so straightforward and simple. It started with block #1 almost 1,5 years ago and every 45 seconds or so a new block linked to the previous block is being added. Resulting in a chain of blocks with transactions in it that everyone can verify from block #1 to the current #647.000+ block. The state is ever changing and the states it can find itself in are infinite. And while the traffic light might work together in tandem with various other traffic lights, it’s rather insignificant comparing it to a public blockchain. Because Zilliqa consists of 2400 nodes who need to work together to achieve consensus on what the latest valid state is while some of these nodes may have latency or broadcast issues, drop offline or are deliberately trying to attack the network, etc.
 
Now go back to the Viewblock page take a look at the amount of transaction, addresses, block and DS height and then hit refresh. Obviously as expected you see new incremented values on one or all parameters. And how did the Zilliqa blockchain manage to transition from a previous valid state to the latest valid state? By using pBFT to reach consensus on the latest valid state.
 
After having obtained the entry ticket, miners execute pBFT to reach consensus on the ever-changing state of the blockchain. pBFT requires a series of network communication between nodes, and as such there is no GPU involved (but CPU). Resulting in the total energy consumed to keep the blockchain secure, decentralized and scalable being low.
 
pBFT stands for practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance and is an optimization on the Byzantine Fault Tolerant algorithm. To quote Blockonomi: “In the context of distributed systems, Byzantine Fault Tolerance is the ability of a distributed computer network to function as desired and correctly reach a sufficient consensus despite malicious components (nodes) of the system failing or propagating incorrect information to other peers.” Zilliqa is such a distributed computer network and depends on the honesty of the nodes (shard and DS) to reach consensus and to continuously update the state with the latest block. If pBFT is a new term for you I can highly recommend the Blockonomi article.
 
The idea of pBFT was introduced in 1999 - one of the authors even won a Turing award for it - and it is well researched and applied in various blockchains and distributed systems nowadays. If you want more advanced information than the Blockonomi link provides click here. And if you’re in between Blockonomi and the University of Singapore read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 2 dating from October 2017.
Quoting from the Zilliqa tech whitepaper: “pBFT relies upon a correct leader (which is randomly selected) to begin each phase and proceed when the sufficient majority exists. In case the leader is byzantine it can stall the entire consensus protocol. To address this challenge, pBFT offers a view change protocol to replace the byzantine leader with another one.”
 
pBFT can tolerate ⅓ of the nodes being dishonest (offline counts as Byzantine = dishonest) and the consensus protocol will function without stalling or hiccups. Once there are more than ⅓ of dishonest nodes but no more than ⅔ the network will be stalled and a view change will be triggered to elect a new DS leader. Only when more than ⅔ of the nodes are dishonest (66%) double-spend attacks become possible.
 
If the network stalls no transactions can be processed and one has to wait until a new honest leader has been elected. When the mainnet was just launched and in its early phases, view changes happened regularly. As of today the last stalling of the network - and view change being triggered - was at the end of October 2019.
 
Another benefit of using pBFT for consensus besides low energy is the immediate finality it provides. Once your transaction is included in a block and the block is added to the chain it’s done. Lastly, take a look at this article where three types of finality are being defined: probabilistic, absolute and economic finality. Zilliqa falls under the absolute finality (just like Tendermint for example). Although lengthy already we skipped through some of the inner workings from Zilliqa’s consensus: read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 3 and you will be close to having a complete picture on it. Enough about PoW, sybil resistance mechanism, pBFT, etc. Another thing we haven’t looked at yet is the amount of decentralization.
 
Decentralisation
 
Currently, there are four shards, each one of them consisting of 600 nodes. 1 shard with 600 so-called DS nodes (Directory Service - they need to achieve a higher difficulty than shard nodes) and 1800 shard nodes of which 250 are shard guards (centralized nodes controlled by the team). The amount of shard guards has been steadily declining from 1200 in January 2019 to 250 as of May 2020. On the Viewblock statistics, you can see that many of the nodes are being located in the US but those are only the (CPU parts of the) shard nodes who perform pBFT. There is no data from where the PoW sources are coming. And when the Zilliqa blockchain starts reaching its transaction capacity limit, a network upgrade needs to be executed to lift the current cap of maximum 2400 nodes to allow more nodes and formation of more shards which will allow to network to keep on scaling according to demand.
Besides shard nodes there are also seed nodes. The main role of seed nodes is to serve as direct access points (for end-users and clients) to the core Zilliqa network that validates transactions. Seed nodes consolidate transaction requests and forward these to the lookup nodes (another type of nodes) for distribution to the shards in the network. Seed nodes also maintain the entire transaction history and the global state of the blockchain which is needed to provide services such as block explorers. Seed nodes in the Zilliqa network are comparable to Infura on Ethereum.
 
The seed nodes were first only operated by Zilliqa themselves, exchanges and Viewblock. Operators of seed nodes like exchanges had no incentive to open them for the greater public. They were centralised at first. Decentralisation at the seed nodes level has been steadily rolled out since March 2020 ( Zilliqa Improvement Proposal 3 ). Currently the amount of seed nodes is being increased, they are public-facing and at the same time PoS is applied to incentivize seed node operators and make it possible for ZIL holders to stake and earn passive yields. Important distinction: seed nodes are not involved with consensus! That is still PoW as entry ticket and pBFT for the actual consensus.
 
5% of the block rewards are being assigned to seed nodes (from the beginning in 2019) and those are being used to pay out ZIL stakers. The 5% block rewards with an annual yield of 10.03% translate to roughly 610 MM ZILs in total that can be staked. Exchanges use the custodial variant of staking and wallets like Moonlet will use the non-custodial version (starting in Q3 2020). Staking is being done by sending ZILs to a smart contract created by Zilliqa and audited by Quantstamp.
 
With a high amount of DS; shard nodes and seed nodes becoming more decentralized too, Zilliqa qualifies for the label of decentralized in my opinion.
 
Smart contracts
 
Let me start by saying I’m not a developer and my programming skills are quite limited. So I‘m taking the ELI5 route (maybe 12) but if you are familiar with Javascript, Solidity or specifically OCaml please head straight to Scilla - read the docs to get a good initial grasp of how Zilliqa’s smart contract language Scilla works and if you ask yourself “why another programming language?” check this article. And if you want to play around with some sample contracts in an IDE click here. The faucet can be found here. And more information on architecture, dapp development and API can be found on the Developer Portal.
If you are more into listening and watching: check this recent webinar explaining Zilliqa and Scilla. Link is time-stamped so you’ll start right away with a platform introduction, roadmap 2020 and afterwards a proper Scilla introduction.
 
Generalized: programming languages can be divided into being ‘object-oriented’ or ‘functional’. Here is an ELI5 given by software development academy: * “all programs have two basic components, data – what the program knows – and behavior – what the program can do with that data. So object-oriented programming states that combining data and related behaviors in one place, is called “object”, which makes it easier to understand how a particular program works. On the other hand, functional programming argues that data and behavior are different things and should be separated to ensure their clarity.” *
 
Scilla is on the functional side and shares similarities with OCaml: OCaml is a general-purpose programming language with an emphasis on expressiveness and safety. It has an advanced type system that helps catch your mistakes without getting in your way. It's used in environments where a single mistake can cost millions and speed matters, is supported by an active community, and has a rich set of libraries and development tools. For all its power, OCaml is also pretty simple, which is one reason it's often used as a teaching language.
 
Scilla is blockchain agnostic, can be implemented onto other blockchains as well, is recognized by academics and won a so-called Distinguished Artifact Award award at the end of last year.
 
One of the reasons why the Zilliqa team decided to create their own programming language focused on preventing smart contract vulnerabilities is that adding logic on a blockchain, programming, means that you cannot afford to make mistakes. Otherwise, it could cost you. It’s all great and fun blockchains being immutable but updating your code because you found a bug isn’t the same as with a regular web application for example. And with smart contracts, it inherently involves cryptocurrencies in some form thus value.
 
Another difference with programming languages on a blockchain is gas. Every transaction you do on a smart contract platform like Zilliqa or Ethereum costs gas. With gas you basically pay for computational costs. Sending a ZIL from address A to address B costs 0.001 ZIL currently. Smart contracts are more complex, often involve various functions and require more gas (if gas is a new concept click here ).
 
So with Scilla, similar to Solidity, you need to make sure that “every function in your smart contract will run as expected without hitting gas limits. An improper resource analysis may lead to situations where funds may get stuck simply because a part of the smart contract code cannot be executed due to gas limits. Such constraints are not present in traditional software systems”. Scilla design story part 1
 
Some examples of smart contract issues you’d want to avoid are: leaking funds, ‘unexpected changes to critical state variables’ (example: someone other than you setting his or her address as the owner of the smart contract after creation) or simply killing a contract.
 
Scilla also allows for formal verification. Wikipedia to the rescue: In the context of hardware and software systems, formal verification is the act of proving or disproving the correctness of intended algorithms underlying a system with respect to a certain formal specification or property, using formal methods of mathematics.
 
Formal verification can be helpful in proving the correctness of systems such as: cryptographic protocols, combinational circuits, digital circuits with internal memory, and software expressed as source code.
 
Scilla is being developed hand-in-hand with formalization of its semantics and its embedding into the Coq proof assistant — a state-of-the art tool for mechanized proofs about properties of programs.”
 
Simply put, with Scilla and accompanying tooling developers can be mathematically sure and proof that the smart contract they’ve written does what he or she intends it to do.
 
Smart contract on a sharded environment and state sharding
 
There is one more topic I’d like to touch on: smart contract execution in a sharded environment (and what is the effect of state sharding). This is a complex topic. I’m not able to explain it any easier than what is posted here. But I will try to compress the post into something easy to digest.
 
Earlier on we have established that Zilliqa can process transactions in parallel due to network sharding. This is where the linear scalability comes from. We can define simple transactions: a transaction from address A to B (Category 1), a transaction where a user interacts with one smart contract (Category 2) and the most complex ones where triggering a transaction results in multiple smart contracts being involved (Category 3). The shards are able to process transactions on their own without interference of the other shards. With Category 1 transactions that is doable, with Category 2 transactions sometimes if that address is in the same shard as the smart contract but with Category 3 you definitely need communication between the shards. Solving that requires to make a set of communication rules the protocol needs to follow in order to process all transactions in a generalised fashion.
 
And this is where the downsides of state sharding comes in currently. All shards in Zilliqa have access to the complete state. Yes the state size (0.1 GB at the moment) grows and all of the nodes need to store it but it also means that they don’t need to shop around for information available on other shards. Requiring more communication and adding more complexity. Computer science knowledge and/or developer knowledge required links if you want to dig further: Scilla - language grammar Scilla - Foundations for Verifiable Decentralised Computations on a Blockchain Gas Accounting NUS x Zilliqa: Smart contract language workshop
 
Easier to follow links on programming Scilla https://learnscilla.com/home Ivan on Tech
 
Roadmap / Zilliqa 2.0
 
There is no strict defined roadmap but here are topics being worked on. And via the Zilliqa website there is also more information on the projects they are working on.
 
Business & Partnerships
 
It’s not only technology in which Zilliqa seems to be excelling as their ecosystem has been expanding and starting to grow rapidly. The project is on a mission to provide OpenFinance (OpFi) to the world and Singapore is the right place to be due to its progressive regulations and futuristic thinking. Singapore has taken a proactive approach towards cryptocurrencies by introducing the Payment Services Act 2019 (PS Act). Among other things, the PS Act will regulate intermediaries dealing with certain cryptocurrencies, with a particular focus on consumer protection and anti-money laundering. It will also provide a stable regulatory licensing and operating framework for cryptocurrency entities, effectively covering all crypto businesses and exchanges based in Singapore. According to PWC 82% of the surveyed executives in Singapore reported blockchain initiatives underway and 13% of them have already brought the initiatives live to the market. There is also an increasing list of organizations that are starting to provide digital payment services. Moreover, Singaporean blockchain developers Building Cities Beyond has recently created an innovation $15 million grant to encourage development on its ecosystem. This all suggests that Singapore tries to position itself as (one of) the leading blockchain hubs in the world.
 
Zilliqa seems to already take advantage of this and recently helped launch Hg Exchange on their platform, together with financial institutions PhillipCapital, PrimePartners and Fundnel. Hg Exchange, which is now approved by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), uses smart contracts to represent digital assets. Through Hg Exchange financial institutions worldwide can use Zilliqa's safe-by-design smart contracts to enable the trading of private equities. For example, think of companies such as Grab, Airbnb, SpaceX that are not available for public trading right now. Hg Exchange will allow investors to buy shares of private companies & unicorns and capture their value before an IPO. Anquan, the main company behind Zilliqa, has also recently announced that they became a partner and shareholder in TEN31 Bank, which is a fully regulated bank allowing for tokenization of assets and is aiming to bridge the gap between conventional banking and the blockchain world. If STOs, the tokenization of assets, and equity trading will continue to increase, then Zilliqa’s public blockchain would be the ideal candidate due to its strategic positioning, partnerships, regulatory compliance and the technology that is being built on top of it.
 
What is also very encouraging is their focus on banking the un(der)banked. They are launching a stablecoin basket starting with XSGD. As many of you know, stablecoins are currently mostly used for trading. However, Zilliqa is actively trying to broaden the use case of stablecoins. I recommend everybody to read this text that Amrit Kumar wrote (one of the co-founders). These stablecoins will be integrated in the traditional markets and bridge the gap between the crypto world and the traditional world. This could potentially revolutionize and legitimise the crypto space if retailers and companies will for example start to use stablecoins for payments or remittances, instead of it solely being used for trading.
 
Zilliqa also released their DeFi strategic roadmap (dating November 2019) which seems to be aligning well with their OpFi strategy. A non-custodial DEX is coming to Zilliqa made by Switcheo which allows cross-chain trading (atomic swaps) between ETH, EOS and ZIL based tokens. They also signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a (soon to be announced) USD stablecoin. And as Zilliqa is all about regulations and being compliant, I’m speculating on it to be a regulated USD stablecoin. Furthermore, XSGD is already created and visible on block explorer and XIDR (Indonesian Stablecoin) is also coming soon via StraitsX. Here also an overview of the Tech Stack for Financial Applications from September 2019. Further quoting Amrit Kumar on this:
 
There are two basic building blocks in DeFi/OpFi though: 1) stablecoins as you need a non-volatile currency to get access to this market and 2) a dex to be able to trade all these financial assets. The rest are built on top of these blocks.
 
So far, together with our partners and community, we have worked on developing these building blocks with XSGD as a stablecoin. We are working on bringing a USD-backed stablecoin as well. We will soon have a decentralised exchange developed by Switcheo. And with HGX going live, we are also venturing into the tokenization space. More to come in the future.”
 
Additionally, they also have this ZILHive initiative that injects capital into projects. There have been already 6 waves of various teams working on infrastructure, innovation and research, and they are not from ASEAN or Singapore only but global: see Grantees breakdown by country. Over 60 project teams from over 20 countries have contributed to Zilliqa's ecosystem. This includes individuals and teams developing wallets, explorers, developer toolkits, smart contract testing frameworks, dapps, etc. As some of you may know, Unstoppable Domains (UD) blew up when they launched on Zilliqa. UD aims to replace cryptocurrency addresses with a human-readable name and allows for uncensorable websites. Zilliqa will probably be the only one able to handle all these transactions onchain due to ability to scale and its resulting low fees which is why the UD team launched this on Zilliqa in the first place. Furthermore, Zilliqa also has a strong emphasis on security, compliance, and privacy, which is why they partnered with companies like Elliptic, ChainSecurity (part of PwC Switzerland), and Incognito. Their sister company Aqilliz (Zilliqa spelled backwards) focuses on revolutionizing the digital advertising space and is doing interesting things like using Zilliqa to track outdoor digital ads with companies like Foodpanda.
 
Zilliqa is listed on nearly all major exchanges, having several different fiat-gateways and recently have been added to Binance’s margin trading and futures trading with really good volume. They also have a very impressive team with good credentials and experience. They don't just have “tech people”. They have a mix of tech people, business people, marketeers, scientists, and more. Naturally, it's good to have a mix of people with different skill sets if you work in the crypto space.
 
Marketing & Community
 
Zilliqa has a very strong community. If you just follow their Twitter their engagement is much higher for a coin that has approximately 80k followers. They also have been ‘coin of the day’ by LunarCrush many times. LunarCrush tracks real-time cryptocurrency value and social data. According to their data, it seems Zilliqa has a more fundamental and deeper understanding of marketing and community engagement than almost all other coins. While almost all coins have been a bit frozen in the last months, Zilliqa seems to be on its own bull run. It was somewhere in the 100s a few months ago and is currently ranked #46 on CoinGecko. Their official Telegram also has over 20k people and is very active, and their community channel which is over 7k now is more active and larger than many other official channels. Their local communities also seem to be growing.
 
Moreover, their community started ‘Zillacracy’ together with the Zilliqa core team ( see www.zillacracy.com ). It’s a community-run initiative where people from all over the world are now helping with marketing and development on Zilliqa. Since its launch in February 2020 they have been doing a lot and will also run their own non-custodial seed node for staking. This seed node will also allow them to start generating revenue for them to become a self sustaining entity that could potentially scale up to become a decentralized company working in parallel with the Zilliqa core team. Comparing it to all the other smart contract platforms (e.g. Cardano, EOS, Tezos etc.) they don't seem to have started a similar initiative (correct me if I’m wrong though). This suggests in my opinion that these other smart contract platforms do not fully understand how to utilize the ‘power of the community’. This is something you cannot ‘buy with money’ and gives many projects in the space a disadvantage.
 
Zilliqa also released two social products called SocialPay and Zeeves. SocialPay allows users to earn ZILs while tweeting with a specific hashtag. They have recently used it in partnership with the Singapore Red Cross for a marketing campaign after their initial pilot program. It seems like a very valuable social product with a good use case. I can see a lot of traditional companies entering the space through this product, which they seem to suggest will happen. Tokenizing hashtags with smart contracts to get network effect is a very smart and innovative idea.
 
Regarding Zeeves, this is a tipping bot for Telegram. They already have 1000s of signups and they plan to keep upgrading it for more and more people to use it (e.g. they recently have added a quiz features). They also use it during AMAs to reward people in real-time. It’s a very smart approach to grow their communities and get familiar with ZIL. I can see this becoming very big on Telegram. This tool suggests, again, that the Zilliqa team has a deeper understanding of what the crypto space and community needs and is good at finding the right innovative tools to grow and scale.
 
To be honest, I haven’t covered everything (i’m also reaching the character limited haha). So many updates happening lately that it's hard to keep up, such as the International Monetary Fund mentioning Zilliqa in their report, custodial and non-custodial Staking, Binance Margin, Futures, Widget, entering the Indian market, and more. The Head of Marketing Colin Miles has also released this as an overview of what is coming next. And last but not least, Vitalik Buterin has been mentioning Zilliqa lately acknowledging Zilliqa and mentioning that both projects have a lot of room to grow. There is much more info of course and a good part of it has been served to you on a silver platter. I invite you to continue researching by yourself :-) And if you have any comments or questions please post here!
submitted by haveyouheardaboutit to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

[FULL ANALYSIS] Bitcoin exchanges and payment processors in Canada are now regulated as Money Service Businesses

Hello Bitcoiners!
Many of you saw my tweet yesterday about the Bitcoin regulations in Canada. As usual, some journalists decided to write articles about my tweets without asking me for the full context :P Which means there has been a lot of misunderstanding. Particuarly, these regulations mean that we can lower the KYC requirements and no longer require ID documents or bank account connections! We can also increase the daily transaction limit from $3,000 per day to $10,000 per day for unverified accounts. The main difference is that we now have a $1,000 per-transaction limit (instead of per day) and we must report suspicious transactions. It's important to read about our reporting requirements, as it is the main difference since pretty much every exchange was doing KYC anyway.
Hopefully you appreciate the transparency, and I'm available for questions!
Cheers,
Francis
*********************************************
Text below is copied from: https://medium.com/bull-bitcoin/bitcoin-exchanges-and-payment-processors-in-canada-are-now-regulated-as-money-service-businesses-1ca820575511

Bitcoin is money, regulated like money

Notice to Canadian Bitcoin users

If you are the user of a Canadian Bitcoin company, be assured that:
You may notice that the exchange service you are using has change its transactions limits or is now requiring more information from you.
You can stop reading this email now without any consequence! Otherwise, keep regarding if you are interested in my unique insights into this important topic!

Background on regulation

Today marks an important chapter for Bitcoin’s history in Canada: Bitcoin is officially regulated as money (virtual currency) under the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act of Canada (PCMLTFA), under the jurisdiction of the Financial Transaction and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC).
This is the culmination of 5 years of effort by numerous Bitcoin Canadian advocates collaborating with the Ministry of Finance, Fintrac and other Canadian government agencies.
It is important to note that there is no new Bitcoin law in Canada. In June of 2014, the Governor General of Canada (representing Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II) gave royal asset to Bill C-31, voted by parliament under Stephen Harper’s Conservative government, which included amendments to the PCMLTFA to included Bitcoin companies (named “dealers in virtual currency”) as a category of Money Service Businesses.
Thereafter, FINTRAC engaged in the process of defining what exactly is meant by “dealing in virtual currency” and what particular rules would apply to the businesses in this category. Much of our work was centred around excluding things like non-custodial wallets, nodes, mining and other activities that were not related exchange or payments processing.
To give an idea, the other categories that apply to traditional fiat currency businesses are:
When we say that Bitcoin is now regulated, what we mean is that these questions have been settled, officially published, and that they are now legally binding.
Businesses that are deemed to be “dealing in virtual currency” must register with FINTRAC as a money service business, just like they would if they were doing traditional currency exchange or payment processing.
There is no “license” required, which means that you do not need the government’s approval before you can operate a Bitcoin exchange business. However, when you operate a Money Service Business, you must register and comply with the laws… otherwise you risk jail time and large fines.

What activities are regulated as Money Service Business activity?

A virtual currency exchange transaction is defined as: “an exchange, at the request of another person or entity, of virtual currency for funds, funds for virtual currency or one virtual currency for another.” This includes, but is not limited to:

Notice to foreign Bitcoin companies with clients in Canada

Regardless of whether or not your business is based in Canada, you must register with FINTRAC as a Foreign Money Service Business, if:

How this affects BullBitcoin.com and Bylls.com

The regulation of Bitcoin exchange and payment services has always been inevitable. If we want Bitcoin to be considered as money, we must accept that it will be regulated like other monies. Our stance on the regulation issue has always been that Bitcoin exchanges and payment processors should be regulated like fiat currency exchanges and payment processors, no more, no less. This is the outcome we obtained.
To comply with these regulations, we are implementing a few changes to our Know-Your-Customer requirement and transaction limits which may paradoxically make your experience using Bull Bitcoin and Bylls even more private and convenient!

The bad news

The good news

To understand these regulations, we highly recommend reading this summary by our good friends and partners at Outlier Compliance.

Summary of our obligations

Our responsibilities:
The information required to perform a compliant know-your-customer validation:
Record keeping obligations:

Suspicious transaction reporting

Satoshi Portal is required to make suspicious transactions report to FINTRAC after we have detected a fact that amounts to reasonable grounds to suspect that one of your transactions is related to the commission or attempted commission of a money laundering offence or a terrorist activity financing offence.
Failure by Satoshi Portal Inc. to report a suspicious transaction could lead to up to five years imprisonment, a fine of up to $2,000,000, or both, for its executives.
We are not allowed to share with anyone other than FINTRAC, including our clients, the contents of a suspicious transaction report as well as the fact that a suspicious transaction report has been filed.

What is suspicious activity?

Note for bitcoinca: this section applies ONLY to Bull Bitcoin. Most exchanges have much stricter interpretation of what is suspicious. You should operate under the assumption that using Coinjoin or TOR will get you flagged at some other exchanges even though it's okay for Bull Bitcoin. That is simply because we have a more sophisticated understanding of privacy best practices.
Identifying suspicious behavior is heavily dependent on the context of each transaction. We understand and take into account that for many of our customers, privacy and libertarian beliefs are of the utmost importance, and that some users may not know that the behavior they are engaging in is suspicious. When we are concerned or confused about the behaviors of our users, we endeavour to discuss it with them before jumping to conclusions.
In general, here are a few tips:
Here are some examples of behavior that we do not consider suspicious:
Here are some example indicators of behavior that would lead us to investigate whether or not a transaction is suspicious:

What does this mean for Bitcoin?

It was always standard practice for Bitcoin companies to operate under the assumption they would eventually be regulated and adopt policies and procedures as if they were already regulated. The same practices used for legal KYC were already commonplace to mitigate fraud (chargebacks).
In addition, law enforcement and other government agencies in Canada were already issuing subpoenas and information requests to Bitcoin companies to obtain the information of users that were under investigation.
We suspect that cash-based Bitcoin exchanges, whether Bitcoin ATMs, physical Bitcoin exchanges or Peer-to-Peer trading, will be the most affected since they will no longer be able to operate without KYC and the absence of KYC was the primary feature that allowed them to justify charging such high fees and exchange rate premiums.
One thing is certain, as of today, there is no ambiguity whatsoever that Bitcoin is 100% legal and regulated in Canada!
submitted by FrancisPouliot to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

Namecoin and the future of self-sovereign digital identity.

Namecoin's motto is "Bitcoin frees money – Namecoin frees DNS, identities, and other technologies."
biolizard89 has done fantastic work on the DNS part, but let's focus on the identity use case here. Recent events have convinced me that digital identity on the internet is broken. Consider:
What was true in 1993 when cartoonist Peter Steiner wrote "On the internet, nobody knows you are a dog" is still true today. The only difference is that identity is increasingly being weaponized using AI/ML so "On the internet, nobody knows you are a bot" would perhaps be more apt.
I read the following comment from a user on slashdot yesterday:
For the time being, you can assume that this comment was written by a human being. You can click on my username, look back at my history of posts, and go, "OK, here's a bunch of posts, by a person, going back more than a decade, to the TIME BEFORE BOTS." That is, before the first year of 2020.
Since humans are likely to adopt the majority opinion, bad actors find real value in being able to control the narrative online by surrounding the reader with manufactured opinions by bots that due to advances in ML/AI are quickly becoming indistinguishable from real users. This amounts to a Sybil attack on the minds of digital content consumers and poses major threat to the integrity of our social fabric.
Apart from the recent twitter incident used for scamming, nation states have been known to create massive bot armies of fake and hijacked user accounts to try and shift the narratives regarding the Hong Kong independence protests as well as national elections. This will only increase.
Currently, our digital identity is fragmented into silo's largely controlled by government institutions and mega corporations (FAANG) based on a "Trust us" model. As recent events have proven, this is a bad model and in dire need of improvement/replacement. IMHO we need to move from "Trust us" to a "Trust but verify" model where the user is in full control of their digital identity.
Namecoin can and should play an important role in building this 'web of trust composed of self-sovereign identities" as it is neutral (no owner), permissionless and secure (merge-mined). Daniel already developed a proof of concept with NameID but what can we do to take this further?
Personally I'd like to see users create Namecoin identities and link them to their social identities (e.g. Google, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, etc). Then whenever they create content, they sign it with their private keys. This would allow a reader to verify the content was created by the user. Content verification would have stopped the recent twitter hack, because even if the hackers would have access to internal admin tools they would not have the private keys that the users produce valid content with. "Not your keys, not your content"
Content verification is only one part. Ideally a user would like to verify the integrity of the content creator as well. E.g. has this user passed human verification in any of the linked platforms? Does a trusted linked entity vouch for the reputation or integrity of this user (e.g. a government entity, financial entity or non-governmental organization?). This would require those platforms to allow linking of Namecoin ID with their Platform ID and allow lookup and signing of metadata provided by these platforms. (e.g. UserID Y is linked to PlatformID X and completed human verification on date Z, signed Twitter).
I image users could install an extension similar to uBlock or Privacy Badger that contains human curated blacklists and heuristics that operate on Namecoin entities to perform these checks and flag or filter content and users that fail integrity checks. This would allow a users to automatically weed out potential bots and trolls but keep full control of this process themselves, avoiding potential censorship if this task would fall on the platform owners themselves (something governments are pushing for).
We could take this even further and integrate Namecoin ID's in software and hardware devices as well. This could create chains of trust to verify the entire chain of content creation and manipulation to the final content posted on a social platform. Where every entity signs the resulting content. (E.g. camera -> photoshop -> twitter post)
Apart from signing content/messages (PGP style). Namecoin could perhaps also be used for managing identity tokens in a users 'Identity wallet'. Looking into my physical wallet this could include things like credit cards, insurance cards, government issued IDs, membership cards, transportation cards, key cards, etc. This could be done similar to 'colored coins' on Bitcoin. But would have to support some type of smart contract functionality to be useful (e.g. expiring tokens, etc).
I'm not a developer nor a technical writer, but I do think we need to think long and hard about how we can solve digital identity in a way that empowers users to trust and verify the content and identities of the peers we interact with online while also respecting privacy and preventing censorship by external parties. Namecoin could be the better path to building this web of trust, but given the current pace of AI/ML and the willingness by bad actors to weaponize it at scale against users interests we might not have much time. (Apologies for the rant!)
submitted by rmvaandr to Namecoin [link] [comments]

MTG Remote - A Google Hangouts MTG Toolset

Hey all! It seems like there's a lots of interest in playing Magic over video chat recently due to the pandemic. I started developing this tool back in November as a way to help my friends and I play over Google Hangouts. It started out as a simple life tracker web page, but evolved into a chrome plugin with many more features. I wasn't going to announce this until it was much more full featured, but I thought people on here might find it useful now.
MTG Remote is a suite of tools that makes playing Magic: The Gathering over Google Hangouts much easier.
v0.7 (2020-04-12)
New this version: - Fixed card recognizer only working for hangout initiator - Added reset life totals buttons (20 or 40 life) - Added reset history button - Added option to have recognizer ignore cards already in history - New user interface for setting card recognizer bounds
Features include: - A multi-user life tracker with commander damage, poison and energy tracking - A shared card image lookup with history - Webcam card reconizer! Automatically detect cards and send them to the shared card display - A private card image lookup - Alternate card art version selection - Prevents mirroring of own webcam video - Turn order randomizer Each player who joins a google hangout video chat with this extension will automatically be added to the life tracker. Use the +/- buttons to increase/decrease your life total and other users in your hangout will see your updated life total on their screens. Use the card icon on the right hand side to bring up the card search. Start typing and the card names will appear in a dropdown. Select a card and it's image will be displayed to all players.
Future versions will include: - Dice roller, coin flipper - Decklist loading
Here's the site
Here's the chrome web store link
This extension is and always will be free, but if you'd like to donate to help fund server hosting costs, I've set up a Patreon and a Paypal as well as a Bitcoin wallet: bc1qent8dn3pyyzxlfz0sqpn9ttcdkn7p63zllrycy.
submitted by Sweenbot to Magicthequarantining [link] [comments]

Why i’m bullish on Zilliqa (long read)

Hey all, I've been researching coins since 2017 and have gone through 100s of them in the last 3 years. I got introduced to blockchain via Bitcoin of course, analysed Ethereum thereafter and from that moment I have a keen interest in smart contact platforms. I’m passionate about Ethereum but I find Zilliqa to have a better risk reward ratio. Especially because Zilliqa has found an elegant balance between being secure, decentralised and scalable in my opinion.
 
Below I post my analysis why from all the coins I went through I’m most bullish on Zilliqa (yes I went through Tezos, EOS, NEO, VeChain, Harmony, Algorand, Cardano etc.). Note that this is not investment advice and although it's a thorough analysis there is obviously some bias involved. Looking forward to what you all think!
 
Fun fact: the name Zilliqa is a play on ‘silica’ silicon dioxide which means “Silicon for the high-throughput consensus computer.”
 
This post is divided into (i) Technology, (ii) Business & Partnerships, and (iii) Marketing & Community. I’ve tried to make the technology part readable for a broad audience. If you’ve ever tried understanding the inner workings of Bitcoin and Ethereum you should be able to grasp most parts. Otherwise just skim through and once you are zoning out head to the next part.
 
Technology and some more:
 
Introduction The technology is one of the main reasons why I’m so bullish on Zilliqa. First thing you see on their website is: “Zilliqa is a high-performance, high-security blockchain platform for enterprises and next-generation applications.” These are some bold statements.
 
Before we deep dive into the technology let’s take a step back in time first as they have quite the history. The initial research paper from which Zilliqa originated dates back to August 2016: Elastico: A Secure Sharding Protocol For Open Blockchains where Loi Luu (Kyber Network) is one of the co-authors. Other ideas that led to the development of what Zilliqa has become today are: Bitcoin-NG, collective signing CoSi, ByzCoin and Omniledger.
 
The technical white paper was made public in August 2017 and since then they have achieved everything stated in the white paper and also created their own open source intermediate level smart contract language called Scilla (functional programming language similar to OCaml) too.
 
Mainnet is live since end of January 2019 with daily transaction rate growing continuously. About a week ago mainnet reached 5 million transactions, 500.000+ addresses in total along with 2400 nodes keeping the network decentralised and secure. Circulating supply is nearing 11 billion and currently only mining rewards are left. Maximum supply is 21 billion with annual inflation being 7.13% currently and will only decrease with time.
 
Zilliqa realised early on that the usage of public cryptocurrencies and smart contracts were increasing but decentralised, secure and scalable alternatives were lacking in the crypto space. They proposed to apply sharding onto a public smart contract blockchain where the transaction rate increases almost linear with the increase in amount of nodes. More nodes = higher transaction throughput and increased decentralisation. Sharding comes in many forms and Zilliqa uses network-, transaction- and computational sharding. Network sharding opens up the possibility of using transaction- and computational sharding on top. Zilliqa does not use state sharding for now. We’ll come back to this later.
 
Before we continue disecting how Zilliqa achieves such from a technological standpoint it’s good to keep in mind that a blockchain being decentralised and secure and scalable is still one of the main hurdles in allowing widespread usage of decentralised networks. In my opinion this needs to be solved first before blockchains can get to the point where they can create and add large scale value. So I invite you to read the next section to grasp the underlying fundamentals. Because after all these premises need to be true otherwise there isn’t a fundamental case to be bullish on Zilliqa, right?
 
Down the rabbit hole
 
How have they achieved this? Let’s define the basics first: key players on Zilliqa are the users and the miners. A user is anybody who uses the blockchain to transfer funds or run smart contracts. Miners are the (shard) nodes in the network who run the consensus protocol and get rewarded for their service in Zillings (ZIL). The mining network is divided into several smaller networks called shards, which is also referred to as ‘network sharding’. Miners subsequently are randomly assigned to a shard by another set of miners called DS (Directory Service) nodes. The regular shards process transactions and the outputs of these shards are eventually combined by the DS shard as they reach consensus on the final state. More on how these DS shards reach consensus (via pBFT) will be explained later on.
 
The Zilliqa network produces two types of blocks: DS blocks and Tx blocks. One DS Block consists of 100 Tx Blocks. And as previously mentioned there are two types of nodes concerned with reaching consensus: shard nodes and DS nodes. Becoming a shard node or DS node is being defined by the result of a PoW cycle (Ethash) at the beginning of the DS Block. All candidate mining nodes compete with each other and run the PoW (Proof-of-Work) cycle for 60 seconds and the submissions achieving the highest difficulty will be allowed on the network. And to put it in perspective: the average difficulty for one DS node is ~ 2 Th/s equaling 2.000.000 Mh/s or 55 thousand+ GeForce GTX 1070 / 8 GB GPUs at 35.4 Mh/s. Each DS Block 10 new DS nodes are allowed. And a shard node needs to provide around 8.53 GH/s currently (around 240 GTX 1070s). Dual mining ETH/ETC and ZIL is possible and can be done via mining software such as Phoenix and Claymore. There are pools and if you have large amounts of hashing power (Ethash) available you could mine solo.
 
The PoW cycle of 60 seconds is a peak performance and acts as an entry ticket to the network. The entry ticket is called a sybil resistance mechanism and makes it incredibly hard for adversaries to spawn lots of identities and manipulate the network with these identities. And after every 100 Tx Blocks which corresponds to roughly 1,5 hour this PoW process repeats. In between these 1,5 hour no PoW needs to be done meaning Zilliqa’s energy consumption to keep the network secure is low. For more detailed information on how mining works click here.
Okay, hats off to you. You have made it this far. Before we go any deeper down the rabbit hole we first must understand why Zilliqa goes through all of the above technicalities and understand a bit more what a blockchain on a more fundamental level is. Because the core of Zilliqa’s consensus protocol relies on the usage of pBFT (practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance) we need to know more about state machines and their function. Navigate to Viewblock, a Zilliqa block explorer, and just come back to this article. We will use this site to navigate through a few concepts.
 
We have established that Zilliqa is a public and distributed blockchain. Meaning that everyone with an internet connection can send ZILs, trigger smart contracts etc. and there is no central authority who fully controls the network. Zilliqa and other public and distributed blockchains (like Bitcoin and Ethereum) can also be defined as state machines.
 
Taking the liberty of paraphrasing examples and definitions given by Samuel Brooks’ medium article, he describes the definition of a blockchain (like Zilliqa) as:
“A peer-to-peer, append-only datastore that uses consensus to synchronise cryptographically-secure data”.
 
Next he states that: >“blockchains are fundamentally systems for managing valid state transitions”.* For some more context, I recommend reading the whole medium article to get a better grasp of the definitions and understanding of state machines. Nevertheless, let’s try to simplify and compile it into a single paragraph. Take traffic lights as an example: all its states (red, amber and green) are predefined, all possible outcomes are known and it doesn’t matter if you encounter the traffic light today or tomorrow. It will still behave the same. Managing the states of a traffic light can be done by triggering a sensor on the road or pushing a button resulting in one traffic lights’ state going from green to red (via amber) and another light from red to green.
 
With public blockchains like Zilliqa this isn’t so straightforward and simple. It started with block #1 almost 1,5 years ago and every 45 seconds or so a new block linked to the previous block is being added. Resulting in a chain of blocks with transactions in it that everyone can verify from block #1 to the current #647.000+ block. The state is ever changing and the states it can find itself in are infinite. And while the traffic light might work together in tandem with various other traffic lights, it’s rather insignificant comparing it to a public blockchain. Because Zilliqa consists of 2400 nodes who need to work together to achieve consensus on what the latest valid state is while some of these nodes may have latency or broadcast issues, drop offline or are deliberately trying to attack the network etc.
 
Now go back to the Viewblock page take a look at the amount of transaction, addresses, block and DS height and then hit refresh. Obviously as expected you see new incremented values on one or all parameters. And how did the Zilliqa blockchain manage to transition from a previous valid state to the latest valid state? By using pBFT to reach consensus on the latest valid state.
 
After having obtained the entry ticket, miners execute pBFT to reach consensus on the ever changing state of the blockchain. pBFT requires a series of network communication between nodes, and as such there is no GPU involved (but CPU). Resulting in the total energy consumed to keep the blockchain secure, decentralised and scalable being low.
 
pBFT stands for practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance and is an optimisation on the Byzantine Fault Tolerant algorithm. To quote Blockonomi: “In the context of distributed systems, Byzantine Fault Tolerance is the ability of a distributed computer network to function as desired and correctly reach a sufficient consensus despite malicious components (nodes) of the system failing or propagating incorrect information to other peers.” Zilliqa is such a distributed computer network and depends on the honesty of the nodes (shard and DS) to reach consensus and to continuously update the state with the latest block. If pBFT is a new term for you I can highly recommend the Blockonomi article.
 
The idea of pBFT was introduced in 1999 - one of the authors even won a Turing award for it - and it is well researched and applied in various blockchains and distributed systems nowadays. If you want more advanced information than the Blockonomi link provides click here. And if you’re in between Blockonomi and University of Singapore read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 2 dating from October 2017.
Quoting from the Zilliqa tech whitepaper: “pBFT relies upon a correct leader (which is randomly selected) to begin each phase and proceed when the sufficient majority exists. In case the leader is byzantine it can stall the entire consensus protocol. To address this challenge, pBFT offers a view change protocol to replace the byzantine leader with another one.”
 
pBFT can tolerate ⅓ of the nodes being dishonest (offline counts as Byzantine = dishonest) and the consensus protocol will function without stalling or hiccups. Once there are more than ⅓ of dishonest nodes but no more than ⅔ the network will be stalled and a view change will be triggered to elect a new DS leader. Only when more than ⅔ of the nodes are dishonest (>66%) double spend attacks become possible.
 
If the network stalls no transactions can be processed and one has to wait until a new honest leader has been elected. When the mainnet was just launched and in its early phases, view changes happened regularly. As of today the last stalling of the network - and view change being triggered - was at the end of October 2019.
 
Another benefit of using pBFT for consensus besides low energy is the immediate finality it provides. Once your transaction is included in a block and the block is added to the chain it’s done. Lastly, take a look at this article where three types of finality are being defined: probabilistic, absolute and economic finality. Zilliqa falls under the absolute finality (just like Tendermint for example). Although lengthy already we skipped through some of the inner workings from Zilliqa’s consensus: read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 3 and you will be close to having a complete picture on it. Enough about PoW, sybil resistance mechanism, pBFT etc. Another thing we haven’t looked at yet is the amount of decentralisation.
 
Decentralisation
 
Currently there are four shards, each one of them consisting of 600 nodes. 1 shard with 600 so called DS nodes (Directory Service - they need to achieve a higher difficulty than shard nodes) and 1800 shard nodes of which 250 are shard guards (centralised nodes controlled by the team). The amount of shard guards has been steadily declining from 1200 in January 2019 to 250 as of May 2020. On the Viewblock statistics you can see that many of the nodes are being located in the US but those are only the (CPU parts of the) shard nodes who perform pBFT. There is no data from where the PoW sources are coming. And when the Zilliqa blockchain starts reaching their transaction capacity limit, a network upgrade needs to be executed to lift the current cap of maximum 2400 nodes to allow more nodes and formation of more shards which will allow to network to keep on scaling according to demand.
Besides shard nodes there are also seed nodes. The main role of seed nodes is to serve as direct access points (for end users and clients) to the core Zilliqa network that validates transactions. Seed nodes consolidate transaction requests and forward these to the lookup nodes (another type of nodes) for distribution to the shards in the network. Seed nodes also maintain the entire transaction history and the global state of the blockchain which is needed to provide services such as block explorers. Seed nodes in the Zilliqa network are comparable to Infura on Ethereum.
 
The seed nodes were first only operated by Zilliqa themselves, exchanges and Viewblock. Operators of seed nodes like exchanges had no incentive to open them for the greater public.They were centralised at first. Decentralisation at the seed nodes level has been steadily rolled out since March 2020 ( Zilliqa Improvement Proposal 3 ). Currently the amount of seed nodes is being increased, they are public facing and at the same time PoS is applied to incentivize seed node operators and make it possible for ZIL holders to stake and earn passive yields. Important distinction: seed nodes are not involved with consensus! That is still PoW as entry ticket and pBFT for the actual consensus.
 
5% of the block rewards are being assigned to seed nodes (from the beginning in 2019) and those are being used to pay out ZIL stakers.The 5% block rewards with an annual yield of 10.03% translates to roughly 610 MM ZILs in total that can be staked. Exchanges use the custodial variant of staking and wallets like Moonlet will use the non custodial version (starting in Q3 2020). Staking is being done by sending ZILs to a smart contract created by Zilliqa and audited by Quantstamp.
 
With a high amount of DS & shard nodes and seed nodes becoming more decentralised too, Zilliqa qualifies for the label of decentralised in my opinion.
 
Smart contracts
 
Let me start by saying I’m not a developer and my programming skills are quite limited. So I‘m taking the ELI5 route (maybe 12) but if you are familiar with Javascript, Solidity or specifically OCaml please head straight to Scilla - read the docs to get a good initial grasp of how Zilliqa’s smart contract language Scilla works and if you ask yourself “why another programming language?” check this article. And if you want to play around with some sample contracts in an IDE click here. Faucet can be found here. And more information on architecture, dapp development and API can be found on the Developer Portal.
If you are more into listening and watching: check this recent webinar explaining Zilliqa and Scilla. Link is time stamped so you’ll start right away with a platform introduction, R&D roadmap 2020 and afterwards a proper Scilla introduction.
 
Generalised: programming languages can be divided into being ‘object oriented’ or ‘functional’. Here is an ELI5 given by software development academy: > “all programmes have two basic components, data – what the programme knows – and behaviour – what the programme can do with that data. So object-oriented programming states that combining data and related behaviours in one place, is called “object”, which makes it easier to understand how a particular program works. On the other hand, functional programming argues that data and behaviour are different things and should be separated to ensure their clarity.”
 
Scilla is on the functional side and shares similarities with OCaml: > OCaml is a general purpose programming language with an emphasis on expressiveness and safety. It has an advanced type system that helps catch your mistakes without getting in your way. It's used in environments where a single mistake can cost millions and speed matters, is supported by an active community, and has a rich set of libraries and development tools. For all its power, OCaml is also pretty simple, which is one reason it's often used as a teaching language.
 
Scilla is blockchain agnostic, can be implemented onto other blockchains as well, is recognised by academics and won a so called Distinguished Artifact Award award at the end of last year.
 
One of the reasons why the Zilliqa team decided to create their own programming language focused on preventing smart contract vulnerabilities safety is that adding logic on a blockchain, programming, means that you cannot afford to make mistakes. Otherwise it could cost you. It’s all great and fun blockchains being immutable but updating your code because you found a bug isn’t the same as with a regular web application for example. And with smart contracts it inherently involves cryptocurrencies in some form thus value.
 
Another difference with programming languages on a blockchain is gas. Every transaction you do on a smart contract platform like Zilliqa for Ethereum costs gas. With gas you basically pay for computational costs. Sending a ZIL from address A to address B costs 0.001 ZIL currently. Smart contracts are more complex, often involve various functions and require more gas (if gas is a new concept click here ).
 
So with Scilla, similar to Solidity, you need to make sure that “every function in your smart contract will run as expected without hitting gas limits. An improper resource analysis may lead to situations where funds may get stuck simply because a part of the smart contract code cannot be executed due to gas limits. Such constraints are not present in traditional software systems”. Scilla design story part 1
 
Some examples of smart contract issues you’d want to avoid are: leaking funds, ‘unexpected changes to critical state variables’ (example: someone other than you setting his or her address as the owner of the smart contract after creation) or simply killing a contract.
 
Scilla also allows for formal verification. Wikipedia to the rescue:
In the context of hardware and software systems, formal verification is the act of proving or disproving the correctness of intended algorithms underlying a system with respect to a certain formal specification or property, using formal methods of mathematics.
 
Formal verification can be helpful in proving the correctness of systems such as: cryptographic protocols, combinational circuits, digital circuits with internal memory, and software expressed as source code.
 
Scilla is being developed hand-in-hand with formalization of its semantics and its embedding into the Coq proof assistant — a state-of-the art tool for mechanized proofs about properties of programs.”
 
Simply put, with Scilla and accompanying tooling developers can be mathematically sure and proof that the smart contract they’ve written does what he or she intends it to do.
 
Smart contract on a sharded environment and state sharding
 
There is one more topic I’d like to touch on: smart contract execution in a sharded environment (and what is the effect of state sharding). This is a complex topic. I’m not able to explain it any easier than what is posted here. But I will try to compress the post into something easy to digest.
 
Earlier on we have established that Zilliqa can process transactions in parallel due to network sharding. This is where the linear scalability comes from. We can define simple transactions: a transaction from address A to B (Category 1), a transaction where a user interacts with one smart contract (Category 2) and the most complex ones where triggering a transaction results in multiple smart contracts being involved (Category 3). The shards are able to process transactions on their own without interference of the other shards. With Category 1 transactions that is doable, with Category 2 transactions sometimes if that address is in the same shard as the smart contract but with Category 3 you definitely need communication between the shards. Solving that requires to make a set of communication rules the protocol needs to follow in order to process all transactions in a generalised fashion.
 
And this is where the downsides of state sharding comes in currently. All shards in Zilliqa have access to the complete state. Yes the state size (0.1 GB at the moment) grows and all of the nodes need to store it but it also means that they don’t need to shop around for information available on other shards. Requiring more communication and adding more complexity. Computer science knowledge and/or developer knowledge required links if you want to dig further: Scilla - language grammar Scilla - Foundations for Verifiable Decentralised Computations on a Blockchain Gas Accounting NUS x Zilliqa: Smart contract language workshop
 
Easier to follow links on programming Scilla https://learnscilla.com/home Ivan on Tech
 
Roadmap / Zilliqa 2.0
 
There is no strict defined roadmap but here are topics being worked on. And via the Zilliqa website there is also more information on the projects they are working on.
 
Business & Partnerships  
It’s not only technology in which Zilliqa seems to be excelling as their ecosystem has been expanding and starting to grow rapidly. The project is on a mission to provide OpenFinance (OpFi) to the world and Singapore is the right place to be due to its progressive regulations and futuristic thinking. Singapore has taken a proactive approach towards cryptocurrencies by introducing the Payment Services Act 2019 (PS Act). Among other things, the PS Act will regulate intermediaries dealing with certain cryptocurrencies, with a particular focus on consumer protection and anti-money laundering. It will also provide a stable regulatory licensing and operating framework for cryptocurrency entities, effectively covering all crypto businesses and exchanges based in Singapore. According to PWC 82% of the surveyed executives in Singapore reported blockchain initiatives underway and 13% of them have already brought the initiatives live to the market. There is also an increasing list of organisations that are starting to provide digital payment services. Moreover, Singaporean blockchain developers Building Cities Beyond has recently created an innovation $15 million grant to encourage development on its ecosystem. This all suggest that Singapore tries to position itself as (one of) the leading blockchain hubs in the world.
 
Zilliqa seems to already taking advantage of this and recently helped launch Hg Exchange on their platform, together with financial institutions PhillipCapital, PrimePartners and Fundnel. Hg Exchange, which is now approved by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), uses smart contracts to represent digital assets. Through Hg Exchange financial institutions worldwide can use Zilliqa's safe-by-design smart contracts to enable the trading of private equities. For example, think of companies such as Grab, AirBnB, SpaceX that are not available for public trading right now. Hg Exchange will allow investors to buy shares of private companies & unicorns and capture their value before an IPO. Anquan, the main company behind Zilliqa, has also recently announced that they became a partner and shareholder in TEN31 Bank, which is a fully regulated bank allowing for tokenization of assets and is aiming to bridge the gap between conventional banking and the blockchain world. If STOs, the tokenization of assets, and equity trading will continue to increase, then Zilliqa’s public blockchain would be the ideal candidate due to its strategic positioning, partnerships, regulatory compliance and the technology that is being built on top of it.
 
What is also very encouraging is their focus on banking the un(der)banked. They are launching a stablecoin basket starting with XSGD. As many of you know, stablecoins are currently mostly used for trading. However, Zilliqa is actively trying to broaden the use case of stablecoins. I recommend everybody to read this text that Amrit Kumar wrote (one of the co-founders). These stablecoins will be integrated in the traditional markets and bridge the gap between the crypto world and the traditional world. This could potentially revolutionize and legitimise the crypto space if retailers and companies will for example start to use stablecoins for payments or remittances, instead of it solely being used for trading.
 
Zilliqa also released their DeFi strategic roadmap (dating November 2019) which seems to be aligning well with their OpFi strategy. A non-custodial DEX is coming to Zilliqa made by Switcheo which allows cross-chain trading (atomic swaps) between ETH, EOS and ZIL based tokens. They also signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a (soon to be announced) USD stablecoin. And as Zilliqa is all about regulations and being compliant, I’m speculating on it to be a regulated USD stablecoin. Furthermore, XSGD is already created and visible on block explorer and XIDR (Indonesian Stablecoin) is also coming soon via StraitsX. Here also an overview of the Tech Stack for Financial Applications from September 2019. Further quoting Amrit Kumar on this:
 
There are two basic building blocks in DeFi/OpFi though: 1) stablecoins as you need a non-volatile currency to get access to this market and 2) a dex to be able to trade all these financial assets. The rest are build on top of these blocks.
 
So far, together with our partners and community, we have worked on developing these building blocks with XSGD as a stablecoin. We are working on bringing a USD-backed stablecoin as well. We will soon have a decentralised exchange developed by Switcheo. And with HGX going live, we are also venturing into the tokenization space. More to come in the future.”*
 
Additionally, they also have this ZILHive initiative that injects capital into projects. There have been already 6 waves of various teams working on infrastructure, innovation and research, and they are not from ASEAN or Singapore only but global: see Grantees breakdown by country. Over 60 project teams from over 20 countries have contributed to Zilliqa's ecosystem. This includes individuals and teams developing wallets, explorers, developer toolkits, smart contract testing frameworks, dapps, etc. As some of you may know, Unstoppable Domains (UD) blew up when they launched on Zilliqa. UD aims to replace cryptocurrency addresses with a human readable name and allows for uncensorable websites. Zilliqa will probably be the only one able to handle all these transactions onchain due to ability to scale and its resulting low fees which is why the UD team launched this on Zilliqa in the first place. Furthermore, Zilliqa also has a strong emphasis on security, compliance, and privacy, which is why they partnered with companies like Elliptic, ChainSecurity (part of PwC Switzerland), and Incognito. Their sister company Aqilliz (Zilliqa spelled backwards) focuses on revolutionizing the digital advertising space and is doing interesting things like using Zilliqa to track outdoor digital ads with companies like Foodpanda.
 
Zilliqa is listed on nearly all major exchanges, having several different fiat-gateways and recently have been added to Binance’s margin trading and futures trading with really good volume. They also have a very impressive team with good credentials and experience. They dont just have “tech people”. They have a mix of tech people, business people, marketeers, scientists, and more. Naturally, it's good to have a mix of people with different skill sets if you work in the crypto space.
 
Marketing & Community
 
Zilliqa has a very strong community. If you just follow their Twitter their engagement is much higher for a coin that has approximately 80k followers. They also have been ‘coin of the day’ by LunarCrush many times. LunarCrush tracks real-time cryptocurrency value and social data. According to their data it seems Zilliqa has a more fundamental and deeper understanding of marketing and community engagement than almost all other coins. While almost all coins have been a bit frozen in the last months, Zilliqa seems to be on its own bull run. It was somewhere in the 100s a few months ago and is currently ranked #46 on CoinGecko. Their official Telegram also has over 20k people and is very active, and their community channel which is over 7k now is more active and larger than many other official channels. Their local communities) also seem to be growing.
 
Moreover, their community started ‘Zillacracy’ together with the Zilliqa core team ( see www.zillacracy.com ). It’s a community run initiative where people from all over the world are now helping with marketing and development on Zilliqa. Since its launch in February 2020 they have been doing a lot and will also run their own non custodial seed node for staking. This seed node will also allow them to start generating revenue for them to become a self sustaining entity that could potentially scale up to become a decentralized company working in parallel with the Zilliqa core team. Comparing it to all the other smart contract platforms (e.g. Cardano, EOS, Tezos etc.) they don't seem to have started a similar initiatives (correct me if I’m wrong though). This suggest in my opinion that these other smart contract platforms do not fully understand how to utilize the ‘power of the community’. This is something you cannot ‘buy with money’ and gives many projects in the space a disadvantage.
 
Zilliqa also released two social products called SocialPay and Zeeves. SocialPay allows users to earn ZILs while tweeting with a specific hashtag. They have recently used it in partnership with the Singapore Red Cross for a marketing campaign after their initial pilot program. It seems like a very valuable social product with a good use case. I can see a lot of traditional companies entering the space through this product, which they seem to suggest will happen. Tokenizing hashtags with smart contracts to get network effect is a very smart and innovative idea.
 
Regarding Zeeves, this is a tipping bot for Telegram. They already have 1000s of signups and they plan to keep upgrading it for more and more people to use it (e.g. they recently have added a quiz features). They also use it during AMAs to reward people in real time. It’s a very smart approach to grow their communities and get familiar with ZIL. I can see this becoming very big on Telegram. This tool suggests, again, that the Zilliqa team has a deeper understanding what the crypto space and community needs and is good at finding the right innovative tools to grow and scale.
 
To be honest, I haven’t covered everything (i’m also reaching the character limited haha). So many updates happening lately that it's hard to keep up, such as the International Monetary Fund mentioning Zilliqa in their report, custodial and non-custodial Staking, Binance Margin, Futures & Widget, entering the Indian market, and more. The Head of Marketing Colin Miles has also released this as an overview of what is coming next. And last but not least, Vitalik Buterin has been mentioning Zilliqa lately acknowledging Zilliqa and mentioning that both projects have a lot of room to grow. There is much more info of course and a good part of it has been served to you on a silver platter. I invite you to continue researching by yourself :-) And if you have any comments or questions please post here!
submitted by haveyouheardaboutit to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Is Trezor taking advantage of COVID-19 and Stealing BTC from your wallet too?

Okay, so i wanna start off by saying I've had TREZOR for over 6 months now and only since Monday i started taking it seriously by storing my Bitcoins in there.
I purchased the device after seeing an ad claiming it was un-hackable and the most secure wallet on earth blah blah blah,
since purchased i never transferred more than 2000 in and out of my account but recently i decided to withdraw my funds of around 1.3btc from BINANCE into my TREZOR wallet.
it was in there since Monday 6th of April, but when i logged in early hours of this morning my Bitcoins was gone! and my transactions... i never updated my Trezor device in order for my previous wallets to just Disappear like that. The worst part is i recent moved houses and i cant seem to fine the piece of paper where i input my recovery seed.
i just want to know if this has ever happened to anyone? why does this happen and whats the solution? will i get my money back? as im the type of person who stores all his money on bitcoin and doesn't use banks - that was literally everything i had left.
I'm sat here praying that this is just a server error of some sort and it will all be by the afternoon.
TREZOR if your reading this, i hope this wasn't done on purpose, i hope your not taking advantage of COVID-19 and i hope you can return to me whats mine as soon as possible. i got a strong feeling BTC is going to fall fast soon and i don't want to lose any of what i have!
P.S
Below is a link of the blockchain search of my account, you can see that address starting with (3Gyk52T) is mine and you can see it says i have no money in there, which is weird as i transferred a friend $108 to account ending in (1MJfxqp1Z) and at the exact same time it says 1.29863517 BTC was transferred to account starting with (31kZXzJA5) i don't know if that's one of the other accounts on my wallet as i haven't memorized it yet but i definitely didn't send my full balance to another wallet - Furthermore the money is still in the wallet...
I have posted the Blochain LookUp Link in the Comments as my posts keep getting put down by moderator and making me wait 20mins before i post a new post smh
submitted by nsahebltd to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Badger now supports CashAccounts!

Badger Wallet for Chrome/Firefox v0.7.4 is live w/ support for CashAccounts! CashAccounts allow for human readable account names that are easy to share in conversation. So instead of sharing my address as bitcoincash:qrhncn6hgkhljqg4fuq4px5qg74sjz9fqqj64s9la9 I can share it as cgcardona#122. This makes sharing addresses much more human-friendly and less intimidating.

Downloads

Developer resources

If you're building your own app and want to use CashAccounts you can use the following REST endpoints and npm library.

REST endpoints

npm library

Note: if you create a CashAccount with Badger, you can send and receive tokens to CashAccount handles. Prior CashAccount registrations are not token aware and will work for BCH only.
submitted by cgcardona to btc [link] [comments]

Here is why Bitcoingold is shady and a scam you should dump it as soon as you get it, never buy it!

Update 3: I've done a reverse whois lookup on their website, and found a ton of domains registered under the same email (not same IP) in their whois. the domains look super damn scammy by the way, you can check them out yourself here: https://i.imgur.com/HG31eie.png
And for the actual list if you don't wanna see a picture, here: http://viewdns.info/reversewhois/?q=xiangliao%40gmail.com
I got the email from: https://www.whois.com/whois/btcgpu.org BTG is, without a doubt, a complete scam.
Looks like they tried running several ICOs from the looks of their domain lists. Update 2:
Premined: https://github.com/BTCGPU/BTCGPU/pull/2
Assuming it survives that, without replay protection, big exchanges won't list it, and wallets won't support it. The code is unfinished and in flux that no-one can seriously review it yet, and there's no commit for a testnet definition yet. (thanks to StrawmanGatlingGun)
Update 1: In their Website-Snapshot from the github (https://github.com/BTCGPU/website) they stated that the fork snapshot already processed: "Bitcoin Gold (BTG) is a new proof-of-work cryptocurrency that will be hard forked from the Bitcoin blockchain on October 1 at block height 487427", which actually ended up being September 28th (https://blockchain.info/block-height/487427) partial info thanks to rhuxx for the find.
As some of you may know, Bitcoingold is attempting to fork Bitcoin at the 25th of October. However in the past they decided they'll fork during the Bitcoincash date, both of which have ended up confusing me thus I've decided to do more research on the matter.
As I dug in deeper Bitcoingold started falling apart in front of my eyes losing all my trust in it. Here is what I've found.
First I read about this to get a better idea behind it: https://medium.com/@EthereumRussian/is-another-hardfork-going-to-kill-bitcoin-bitcoin-gold-e49b24ad8a9
The article mentioned there's been an ICO page, intrigued I decided to do a quick google search and found this 29 August bitcointalk thread that has more information regarding it: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2046790.0
Along with the original Bitcoingold developer thread: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2133536.0
It seems that they have possibly ran an ICO (Unsuccessfully most likely) but most certainly had premined the coin, thus I went to their website which at the time (9th of October) only ran a splash screen: http://btcgpu.org/ in an attempt to confirm my doubts.
This didn't lead me far, I needed to confirm those claims by myself, thus I went to the wayback machine (a wayback machine takes snapshots of websites so you can tell what changed in a website over time) and picked the August 31 date of the bitcoingold website. https://web.archive.org/web/20170831032225/http://btcgpu.org/
This confirmed the rumors, the website owners/original developers intended to run an ICO (which may or may not been successful) and also premined 16000 Blocks, worth at least 200,000 Bitcoin gold. The ICO price was supposedly 1 BTC = 10 BTG.
Since they are holding that information away from us and hiding it, this makes me believe that, bitcoingold is infact a scam and an attempt to milk the Crypto community out of their money, please don't fall into this scam and don't buy bitcoingold, dump it and let others know you can even do your own research with the Wayback machine I linked above or any time machine.
Regards, Faycal Kilali
tl;dr BTG (Bitcoin gold is pre-mined 200,000+ BTG, and previously offered as an ICO, now they are trying to hide both of that information from us and telling people to dump their alts to get free "Bitcoin gold". the fork dates do not match, they specified different dates 3 times, once in their github page (1th october, and the block ended up being mined at 28th september) and a third time as 25th of october. all this combined information makes this me believe with no doubt that this is a scam in the making, and you should all dump your BTG as soon as you get it and never, ever buy BTG. also there is no replay protection, incomplete pow implementation, and no difficulity adjustment just the replay protection alone means you can lose your BTC by trying to sell/transfer your BTG, whois email associated domains shows complete scammy icos and domains registered under the email, this without a doubt they are 100% scammers.).
submitted by EnviousArm to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Hacked/compromised computers/network? What steps should I take?

Saw this email on most of my colleagues' spam folder in MS Outlook. The sender and the recipient are the same, my colleagues email addresses. So basically it was sent to/from the same email address:
Subject: Be sure to read this message! Your personal data is threatened!
Hi, dear user of *************.com
We have installed one RAT software into you device For this moment your email account is hacked too. I know your password. I logged in to your account and wrote this letter to you from there.
Changed your password? You're doing great! But my software recognizes every such action. I'm updating passwords! I'm always one step ahead....
So... I have downloaded all confidential information from your system and I got some more evidence. The most interesting moment that I have discovered are videos records where you masturbating.
I posted Spelevo Exploit modification on porn site, and then you installed my malicious code (trojan) on your operation system. When you clicked the button Play on porn video, at that moment my trojan was downloaded to your device. After installation, your front camera shoots video every time you masturbate, in addition, the software is synchronized with the video you choose.
For the moment, the software has harvrested all your contact information from social networks and email addresses. If you need to erase all of your collected data and videos, send me $714 in BTC (crypto currency).
This is my Bitcoin wallet: 13yAsTuS6MyjNUYde4EBabTZJFfZBRTZu1 You have 48 hours after reading this letter.
After your transaction I will erase all your data. Otherwise, I will send a video with your sweepstakes to all your colleagues, friends and relatives!!!
P.S. I ask you not to reply to this email, this is impossible (the sender's address is your own address).
And henceforth be more careful! Please visit only secure sites! Bye,Bye...
Copied and pasted the exact email format. I already checked the header, it came from our company's email/hosting. But I saw this line:
Received: from [14.254.26.179] (port=41608 helo=static.vnpt.vn) Did a whois lookup: https://who.is/whois-ip/ip-address/14.254.26.179
Is this a malware or virus infection? Should I scan each computer on our network? How serious or how threatening is this infection? What steps should I take next?
I already switched to another domain/email hosting last week and changed all email passwords. This email was received from our previous host (webhostingpad.com).
Any tips or help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
submitted by baloy4 to techsupport [link] [comments]

A proposal for a decentralized social network layer capable of storing rich media

Hello folks!
I have been thinking about the idea of decentralised social network for quite some time, and recently the ideas formed what I think is a rather compete picture. In light of recent Yours announcements I think it's a proper time to share these ideas with a community.
It turned into a long post, and there is no guarantee these idea have a contact with reality, so forgive me if I stole a few minutes of your time.
Protools and standards that will help to understand the proposal (besides blockchain): Memo - blockchain-based base social network protocol, WebRTC transport protocol, WebTorrent JavaScript BitTorrent protocol implementation, BidDB - blockchain crawler by u/unwriter, Progressive Web Apps –– cross platform mobile and desktop apps installable without gatekeepers.
Overall, I prefer WebTorrent in my proposal instead of IPFS as BitTorrent protocol is proved to be robust for almost two decades, while IPFS at this moment is very young and overhyped.
What I propose is a layer that can exist on top of any Memo-like protocol, where Memo forms a base social network state, and the media layer extends its capabilities so that it's possible to store rich media files without any centralised hostings.
Here are the hypothesis/axioms I use as a basement for such a media layer
The proposed idea is based on a play of three actors, or a triangle of 'Original Posters' 'Moderators' and 'Viewers'. Below is detailed explanation of each role, and there are some sub-roles that will be discussed alongside.
Original Poster is anyone connected to the internet who is willing to share any kind of content with the world with only modern browser and a content itself in possession.
Moderator is anyone in the connected world who is willing to be engaged into a socially important role with only a desktop computer with decent amount of free disk space in possession. There is no need to ask a permission to become a moderator.
Viewer is anyone willing to enjoy the media without the need to be engaged with existing social media platforms.
Base technologies:
  1. A webtorrent enabled website with a support of basic bch wallet functionaloty.
  2. A webtorrent enabled website with a feed of op_return messages. Note: 1 and 2 can be implemented as a single platform. (e.g. instant.io x datacash x chainfeed)
  3. A webrtc enabled cross platform desktop torrent client hybridised with a bitdb instance
  4. A webtorrent enabled torrent tracker(s)
The flow:
The Original Poster uses a web browser to create a torrent of the attached media. OP registers the torrent on a tracker, puts infohash alongside a tracker url and desired hashtags into op_return and publishes the memo formatted transaction to bitcoin network. The progress bar shows the status of the 'pseudo' upload that's familiar to most non-tech savvy people. During that phase the content is in network’s ‘working-memory’.
The Moderator uses software to parse the op_return feed. The software continuously downloads all the media from initial seeders and presents it to moderator one by one. It does not open itself as a seeder until moderator decided whether this is a kind of content worth bothering. It's completely subjective decision and every moderator can follow personal strategy. It can be imagined as clicking the green and red buttons where the red one is clicked if the content is subjectively a complete garbage. Once the green button is clicked, moderator becomes a seeder of the content. Moderator can also 'reply' to OPs message with hashtags: every hashtag that corresponds to one of initial hashtags gives it additional weight. Every omitted hashtag loses weight. Some new hashtags can as well be introduced by a moderator. The deeper the history of moderator’s categorization activity, the more weight categorization transaction gives to hashtags (but this is a higher level concept and can vary from implementation to implementation). Moderator creates an internal queue of stored media and deletes the oldest content as soon as the storage threshold is hit (but some other policy can be implemented if moderator decides so). Described above is a level00 moderator who decided to judge the very unclassified content that's received directly from initial seeders.
If the collective speed of content approval is lower than speed of new content introduction, OPs is notified that it maybe necessary to wait for a prolonged time for content to be uploaded, or the fee can be included towards a 'super-moderator' address, so moderators who operate under a single swarm will priorities that content. That address can be a mulitisig where each moderator is a part of a joint account. Once in a while they unlock funds and distribute them in accordance to each moderator's contribution based on the number of 'categorisation transactions' – replies with hashtags, and there can be additional rules that prevent cheating such as only one categorisation transaction to each OP post is taken into account, or rules with some degree of centralisation that encourage seeding, such as the more the moderator seeds the more he earns from these fees if the swarm operates under a single tracker). Alternatively, payouts can be implemented as simple and centralised as existing mining pools.
There are Moderator sub-roles, such as a moderator can choose to only parse the content that was categorised to some degree (e.g. only nsfw content, or only non-nsfw content). The deeper the categorisation, the more precise is the kind of content that's fetched by a moderator, to a degree where moderator can actually enjoy the process a lot as he approves the kind of content he is the most interested in, akin to browsing chronologically filtered subreddit feed. Moderator can also choose to parse several 'categories' simply by 'subscribing' to several hashtags or hashtag tuples. The subroles can be named like moderator level01, level10, level11 etc. By replying to lower level moderator's categorisation transactions, higher-level moderators gives or removes hashtags weight.
The Viewer is presented with a feed of op_return media posts (similar to chainfeed.org), and the content is fetched on the fly from the webtorrent network. The moment the content is fetched the viewer becomes a seeder and continues seeding for as long as content is cached inside browser's storage. That way, the more moderators have approved the content, and the more followers the OP has, the longer the content will persist in a network's 'short-term’ memory.
The Viewer role has sub-roles as well. As soon as the user is engaged into that kind of social network, he can become a Loyal User by installing a special software on a desktop computer that is very similar to Moderators's software, but differs in a following way: viewer inputs Memo account identifier (which is a bitcoin address) into the software that only fetches and seeds the content that was liked by a user, completely in background. As the whole network state is a public information, each user can increase the level of loyalty by specifying the maximum 'dimension' of the content being fetched and seeded, where 1D is the content liked by initial viewer, 2D is the content liked by initial viewer and accounts followed by initial viewer and so on, up until around 6D, where mostly anything that was liked is stored within individual's storage threshold. Loyal Viewers can adopt different policies to restrict the content being fetched and seeded by blacklisting or prioritising certain hashtags, adopting some third-party priority/black lists, as well as specifying storage threshold. Contented that is stored by Loyal Users can be imagined as persisted in networks ‘long-term’ memory. The more Loyal Users are engaged in a network, and the more likes certain content has, the longer it will be stored.
It's worth noting that centralised torrent trackers are not points of failure per se as they are mostly used to pass the content from initial [browser] seeders to moderators. As soon as the content is approved by at least one moderator it can be listed on different trackers operated by different entities, and there can be a rotation of trackers if necessary. That said, each moderator can always re-register all of the content in possession on a new tracker, and the tracker can be adopted by web op_return feed providers. Moreover, the ongoing evolution of browser standards related to web-workers will make in-browser dht lookup a reality in a 2-3 years, which is likely a reasonable window to bootstrap such a network. OP can use some trackers only known among neighbours in particular area.
The layer is vulnerable to a situation where trackers blacklist certain content, and such content can be accessed by using a different op_return feed provider with different trackers, or a native app that will be able to fetch content seeders from the dht. Networks such as i2p can be used to create deep media layers operated anonymously. Also, as Tor is adopted by mainstream browsers (e.g. Brave) Viewers can access trackers through Tor, and such trackers are more resilient. These viewers will be unable to seed, however.
The layer is capable of storing any kind of content, but during bootstrap phase it will be most suitable for images, short video/audio messages, markdown formatted blogposts with embedded media. Each Moderator / Loyal Viewer can adopt different policies related to the size of the content being fetched and stored according to investments into storage facilities. If the proposed idea works, there will be parties willing to store some heavyweight content such as movies. If the layer is accessed from within a native app, it's even capable of livestreams, where the more users are watching a stream the more bandwidth there is for others to join, completely without any centralised content distribution networks.
As outlined above, the layer consist of short-term memory layer capable of storing content for minutes-days, and long-term memory layer capable of storing content for months and probably years. I use biological metaphors here instead of computer science ones as in my opinion the behaviour of this media layer resembles human memory more than computer memory, as ultimately it's a collective human brain decides what to remember and for how long. There is no guarantee that something will be stored at all, and at the same time some kind of content that's collectively perceived as valuable can be stored for a prolonged period of time.
Few words in regard to monetisation. Some heavily engaged players can choose to archive old content and provide access in trade for some micropayments. I see like the Joystream protocol can be used here with little changes such as adoption of webrtc transport protocol. Some different monetisation strategies can be discussed later as microtransaction technologies are more mature and well understood.
I am willing to form a workgroup of developers and creative enthusiasts who find the described idea interesting. I have been thinking about a possible starting point, so I have acquired the BlockPress source code with intention to distribute it in open source. We postponed the announcement a bit as the process of open-source release always takes time. BlockPress is an alternative Memo protocol implementation with a rather slick UI that's familiar to non tech savvy users - the quality I find extremely important. I think this can be a good starting point. If you think so as well, feel free to drop me a telegram message @taowanzou or [proton mail](mailto:[email protected]). Follow me on memo as well!
Sorry for any possible mistakes as English is not my primary language. And thanks for you time reading this!
submitted by taowanzou to btc [link] [comments]

Looking for BCH testnet API

Hi everyone,

I'm trying to find a publicly accessible Bitcoin Cash testnet API that doesn't require an account or at the very least doesn't need my private keys, and supports both address balance lookups and posting of raw transactions. I'm using Bitcoin ABC to support this functionality locally but I also need to be able to do this through a remote RPC API (preferably JSON-based).

Here's a quick rundown of where I've looked so far:

https://rest.bitcoin.com/
This seems like the most obvious option and supports the functionality I'm looking for but it appears that it's only for livenet. For example, here's a testnet address with a little over 0.5 tBCH:
https://explorer.bitcoin.com/tbch/address/n22LEtuzgniSXeMBoUjgpqkDm6Nf7SEMi4
...the API call, however, doesn't like this address:
https://rest.bitcoin.com/v2/address/details/bchtest:qrs0pew4sa7qtdz36jwc5rlwlmsfrlhqxuawvcfxsl
{"error":"Invalid network. Trying to use a testnet address on mainnet, or vice versa."}
Maybe there's another API endpoint I should be using here? Unfortunately I'm not seeing it in the documentation.

https://blockdozer.com/

The API documentation doesn't appear to include posting of transactions, raw or otherwise, and the Broadcast Raw Transaction page appears to be for Bitcoin only.

https://dev.btc.com/docs/js

This API appears to require the BlockTrail SDK and the "Sending Transactions" section seems to indicate that it uses a custodial/shared account model: "The SDK handles all the logic of creating the transaction, signing it with your primary key and sending it to the API so BTC.com can co-sign the transaction and send it to the bitcoin network."
Although I understand that it's not the same thing, to me this isn't too far from requiring my private keys (i.e. it's a loss of signing control).

https://www.bitgo.com/api/v2/

This API supports tBCH but uses hosted wallets (i.e. requires an account and private key[s]).

https://blockchair.com/

The API documentation has a section on broadcasting transactions but only lists bitcoin, bitcoin-cash, ethereum, and litecoin as available chains.

https://docs.cryptoapis.io/

Requires an account (API key) but appears to support the tBCH functionality I'm looking for. It's on the back-burner if I can't find anything else.

https://www.blockchain.com/api/blockchain_wallet_api

It looks like this API requires the developer to create and host a wallet with them in order to send transactions. I'm not sure if I'd have any control over the private key(s) here.

https://bitpay.com/api

Appears to require an account and doesn't appear to fully support the functionality I'm looking for.

If I've missed anything or I'm mistaken about what I've looked into I would very much appreciate your feedback! More importantly, if you know of a service that I haven't listed and that can do what I need it to do I thank you in advance for sharing it.
submitted by monican_agent to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

Here is why Bitcoingold is shady and a scam you should dump it as soon as you get it, never buy it!

Update 3: I've done a reverse whois lookup on their website, and found a ton of domains registered under the same email (not same IP) in their whois. the domains look super damn scammy by the way, you can check them out yourself here: https://i.imgur.com/HG31eie.png
And for the actual list if you don't wanna see a picture, here: http://viewdns.info/reversewhois/?q=xiangliao%40gmail.com
I got the email from: https://www.whois.com/whois/btcgpu.org BTG is, without a doubt, a complete scam.
Looks like they tried running several ICOs, one of them is even still active called sandcoin.org (which is obviously a scam too) Update 2: *
Premined: https://github.com/BTCGPU/BTCGPU/pull/2
Assuming it survives that, without replay protection, big exchanges won't list it, and wallets won't support it. The code is unfinished and in flux that no-one can seriously review it yet, and there's no commit for a testnet definition yet. (thanks to StrawmanGatlingGun)
Update 1: In their Website-Snapshot from the github (https://github.com/BTCGPU/website) they stated that the fork snapshot already processed: "Bitcoin Gold (BTG) is a new proof-of-work cryptocurrency that will be hard forked from the Bitcoin blockchain on October 1 at block height 487427", which actually ended up being September 28th (https://blockchain.info/block-height/487427) partial info thanks to rhuxx for the find.
As some of you may know, Bitcoingold is attempting to fork Bitcoin at the 25th of October. However in the past they decided they'll fork during the Bitcoincash date, both of which have ended up confusing me thus I've decided to do more research on the matter.
As I dug in deeper Bitcoingold started falling apart in front of my eyes losing all my trust in it. Here is what I've found.
First I read about this to get a better idea behind it: https://medium.com/@EthereumRussian/is-another-hardfork-going-to-kill-bitcoin-bitcoin-gold-e49b24ad8a9
The article mentioned there's been an ICO page, intrigued I decided to do a quick google search and found this 29 August bitcointalk thread that has more information regarding it: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2046790.0
Along with the original Bitcoingold developer thread: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2133536.0
It seems that they have possibly ran an ICO (Unsuccessfully most likely) but most certainly had premined the coin, thus I went to their website which at the time (9th of October) only ran a splash screen: http://btcgpu.org/ in an attempt to confirm my doubts.
This didn't lead me far, I needed to confirm those claims by myself, thus I went to the wayback machine (a wayback machine takes snapshots of websites so you can tell what changed in a website over time) and picked the August 31 date of the bitcoingold website. https://web.archive.org/web/20170831032225/http://btcgpu.org/
This confirmed the rumors, the website owners/original developers intended to run an ICO (which may or may not been successful) and also premined 16000 Blocks, worth at least 200,000 Bitcoin gold. The ICO price was supposedly 1 BTC = 10 BTG.
Since they are holding that information away from us and hiding it, this makes me believe that, bitcoingold is infact a scam and an attempt to milk the Crypto community out of their money, please don't fall into this scam and don't buy bitcoingold, dump it and let others know you can even do your own research with the Wayback machine I linked above or any time machine.
Regards, Faycal Kilali
tl;dr BTG (Bitcoin gold is pre-mined 200,000+ BTG, and previously offered as an ICO, now they are trying to hide both of that information from us and telling people to dump their alts to get free "Bitcoin gold". the fork dates do not match, they specified different dates 3 times, once in their github page (1th october, and the block ended up being mined at 28th september) and a third time as 25th of october. all this combined information makes this me believe with no doubt that this is a scam in the making, and you should all dump your BTG as soon as you get it and never, ever buy BTG. also there is no replay protection, incomplete pow implementation, and no difficulity adjustment just the replay protection alone means you can lose your BTC by trying to sell/transfer your BTG, whois email associated domains shows complete scammy icos and domains registered under the email, this without a doubt they are 100% scammers.).
submitted by EnviousArm to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Here is why Bitcoingold is shady and a scam you should dump it as soon as you get it, never buy it!

Update 3: I've done a reverse whois lookup on their website, and found a ton of domains registered under the same email (not same IP) in their whois. the domains look super damn scammy by the way, you can check them out yourself here: https://i.imgur.com/HG31eie.png
And for the actual list if you don't wanna see a picture, here: http://viewdns.info/reversewhois/?q=xiangliao%40gmail.com
I got the email from: https://www.whois.com/whois/btcgpu.org BTG is, without a doubt, a complete scam.
Looks like they tried running several ICOs, one of them is even still active called sandcoin.org (which is obviously a scam too) Update 2: *
Premined: https://github.com/BTCGPU/BTCGPU/pull/2
Assuming it survives that, without replay protection, big exchanges won't list it, and wallets won't support it. The code is unfinished and in flux that no-one can seriously review it yet, and there's no commit for a testnet definition yet. (thanks to StrawmanGatlingGun)
Update 1: In their Website-Snapshot from the github (https://github.com/BTCGPU/website) they stated that the fork snapshot already processed: "Bitcoin Gold (BTG) is a new proof-of-work cryptocurrency that will be hard forked from the Bitcoin blockchain on October 1 at block height 487427", which actually ended up being September 28th (https://blockchain.info/block-height/487427) partial info thanks to rhuxx for the find.
As some of you may know, Bitcoingold is attempting to fork Bitcoin at the 25th of October. However in the past they decided they'll fork during the Bitcoincash date, both of which have ended up confusing me thus I've decided to do more research on the matter.
As I dug in deeper Bitcoingold started falling apart in front of my eyes losing all my trust in it. Here is what I've found.
First I read about this to get a better idea behind it: https://medium.com/@EthereumRussian/is-another-hardfork-going-to-kill-bitcoin-bitcoin-gold-e49b24ad8a9
The article mentioned there's been an ICO page, intrigued I decided to do a quick google search and found this 29 August bitcointalk thread that has more information regarding it: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2046790.0
Along with the original Bitcoingold developer thread: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2133536.0
It seems that they have possibly ran an ICO (Unsuccessfully most likely) but most certainly had premined the coin, thus I went to their website which at the time (9th of October) only ran a splash screen: http://btcgpu.org/ in an attempt to confirm my doubts.
This didn't lead me far, I needed to confirm those claims by myself, thus I went to the wayback machine (a wayback machine takes snapshots of websites so you can tell what changed in a website over time) and picked the August 31 date of the bitcoingold website. https://web.archive.org/web/20170831032225/http://btcgpu.org/
This confirmed the rumors, the website owners/original developers intended to run an ICO (which may or may not been successful) and also premined 16000 Blocks, worth at least 200,000 Bitcoin gold. The ICO price was supposedly 1 BTC = 10 BTG.
Since they are holding that information away from us and hiding it, this makes me believe that, bitcoingold is infact a scam and an attempt to milk the Crypto community out of their money, please don't fall into this scam and don't buy bitcoingold, dump it and let others know you can even do your own research with the Wayback machine I linked above or any time machine.
Regards, Faycal Kilali
tl;dr BTG (Bitcoin gold is pre-mined 200,000+ BTG, and previously offered as an ICO, now they are trying to hide both of that information from us and telling people to dump their alts to get free "Bitcoin gold". the fork dates do not match, they specified different dates 3 times, once in their github page (1th october, and the block ended up being mined at 28th september) and a third time as 25th of october. all this combined information makes this me believe with no doubt that this is a scam in the making, and you should all dump your BTG as soon as you get it and never, ever buy BTG. also there is no replay protection, incomplete pow implementation, and no difficulity adjustment just the replay protection alone means you can lose your BTC by trying to sell/transfer your BTG, whois email associated domains shows complete scammy icos and domains registered under the email, this without a doubt they are 100% scammers.).
submitted by EnviousArm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Strange and concerning error regarding nexuswallet.net

Good day, sorry if I'm getting worried about a scam well known in your community, but I was looking up a phone number I didn't recognize and the top result led me to contactsearch.site that displayed an error immediately upon loading, it displayed the following:

Caller Number Lookup

Bitcoin wallet error 408

Can't display results (5.92 kb)
Account Balance:0.93310862 ($7612.15) Login Uri:**REDACTED BY ME**Username:**REDACTED BY ME**Password:**REDACTED BY ME** Error: [408] Value must be greater than 0. Exception raised internally.
The username was an email address, I tried contacting that to inform them that a random site's error had shown me their account credentials including their plain text password, but my mail service reported the email address didn't exist. Is this somehow a scam? I googled nexuswallet.net and it looked to my(admittedly naive/completely inexperienced)eyes to be a legitimate bitcoin wallet service.
If nexuswallet.net is legit they have severe security issues as account usernames and their respective password are being displayed on unrelated websites. Be warned if you use their service!
submitted by ConcernedBlueNoser to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Chainalasys VS Mycelium - The full story

Mycelium Wallets use our own custom nodes to process the bitcoin blockchain and scan for address balances. These nodes were written by Jan Møller while he was the Lead Developer, along with our other devs. The job of these nodes is to parse the 30 gig Blockchain database into our own custom database, which is much larger, being over 100 gigs in size, but which allows for very quick and easy lookup of address balances, allowing for instant balance lookups and to do things like Cold Storage spending from paper wallets and Trezor. Note that this custom database doesn't actually contain anything that's not in the original blockchain database itself.
Mycelium's owner and developers believe in total financial privacy and personal freedom, and our company has a goal to make Mycelium Wallet the most anonymous wallet possible. For this reason, we have kept our wallet code completely open since the beginning, and have been public and open about what goes on internally in our company (I hope you have noticed my frequent updates, especially with the unfortunate Entropy delays). And even while Jan was still the lead dev, we have created LocalTrader to work completely anonymously, using only bitcoin signed messages for user authentication and encrypting all user chat P2P using their respective private keys so our servers receive no usable data. We have also added HD wallet support, and disabled all IP and transaction logging on our nodes. However, we also realize that just us claiming that we do that isn't good enough, and that's why we added full Tor support, and are in the process of implementing CoinJoin, which we hope to have enabled by default, so that even those who don't care about staying anonymous will help contribute. Our goal was to have Mycelium Wallet be as anonymous as Dark Wallet, and that has not changed.
Jan Møller, our lead developer who did most of the work on the nodes, realized that the node-parsed blockchain database can be used to analyze bitcoin transaction activity, and help track transactions in the same way that our current financial institutions do (although with much less certainty). So he decided to have his own project that does just that, and has split off from Mycelium company last October. We still kept him on as our chief technical consultant, since he did write most of the node and original wallet code, so he is technically still employed by Mycelium, but he has had no access to our nodes since he left. Our current full time lead developer is Andreas Petersson, who is working on implementing Coinapult Locks right now, and the other two developers are Jan Dreske (trasla here) and Daniel Weigl, who have been adding support for Trezor, fixing bugs, adding minor requested features, etc.
We at Mycelium are not fans of what Chainalysis does, but we can't really object too much, because if something like this is even possible to do, then someone will do it, whether it's Jan's company or someone else. It's also preferable that this is done by a public company in the open, instead of in secret by a government agency. And secondly, since the developer behind this is someone who worked with us and continues to stay in touch and advise us, we can at least get inside knowledge of what may be tracked and how by such systems, so we can be aware of what to watch out for and what to fix. Obviously it's not a guarantee that we will get an honest answer, but it's still better than nothing.
With regards to why our website's About section still lists Jan Møller as a Lead Developer, it's because our website dev has been working full time on another (secret) Mycelium project, and has not had the chance to change anything. I guess the site is too low of a priority to update. Note that both of our current top wallet developers who have been doing most of the work these past few months, Jan Dreske and Daniel Weigl, are completely missing from there too. I am sorry that I have not publicly stated anything about this either, but since Chainalysis is a completely separate company, Jan Møller has not had access to our internal systems since he became a consultant, and our internal goals are still total anonymity, there was no risk whatsoever to Mycelium or the privacy of our users from the Mycelium side. I have been fairly open about being an AnarchoCapitalist myself, supporting people like Cody Wilson and Ross Ulbricht, and supporting the idea of The four pillars of a decentralized society as explained by Johann Gevers to help decentralize government functions. So if there ever is a risk of Mycelium becoming a snooping agency, or if Mycelium changes its goals with regards to expanding personal freedom, I still promise to let the community know, since there would be no way I would be willing to continue to work there if that happens.
P.S. Yes, we have those Chainalysis nodes blocked on our Mycelium nodes, too, but that's not really a fix, since Chainalysis can just change their IP address.
EDIT: Also, please note that if Mycelium wanted to be involved in this, we would have done this internally ourselves, likely making a ton of money from bankers and regulators in the process. But we didn't, not even allowing Jan to work on this internally, and wouldn't even consider implementing anything like that.
submitted by Rassah to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Thearchy/Subchain Architecture and Device Communication Protocol - An Explanation.

Cell network explanation – Thearchy Chain/Subchain structure
In a recent interview, Dr. Xiang Yu likened the INT structure to that of a Cell Phone network. Much like how cellular networks work, where the network is distributed in geographic areas called cells and each cell is connected to the network by at least 1 cell tower, the INT network will be a network of digitally separate cells which are side chains, and each side chain is connected to the greater network by at least 2 supernodes.
This is done in cell networks, in part, to manage network congestion. Each cell tower manages the connection to the greater network and other cell areas by using one defined frequency or path. This is unlike large transmitters, where there is one path to the network that can get congested, these cells add additional paths like adding lanes to a highway.
We see this issue in single chain blockchains like Bitcoin where in times of large transaction volumes, the network gets congested with transactions and a backlog begins to build.
INT’s concept is along the same theology, by creating subchain cells to manage connection to the network, where the supernodes (like the cell towers) do the transaction processing and pass batched transactions on to the greater network, transaction congestion will be secluded and managed within the subchains and not affect the main network. This will allow easy scaling by adding subchains and supernodes to manage transaction volume.
.
Zero-Knowledge proofs (zk)
Zero knowledge proofs are not easy to describe without using complex analogies or mathematics. Essentially what it does is allows you to prove that I know a secret without revealing what the secret actually is. It is used, most importantly, in identity authentication (protecting node identity, IoT device ownership, etc.), verifying transactions without knowing any details about the sender, recipient or other transaction details. It is unclear at this time how they will go about implementing this into their protocols, but they have mentioned the importance of user and data privacy in the coming IoT data revolution. Implementing ZKP is something that, to my knowledge, has yet to be successfully implemented in a smart contracting blockchain.
.
Double Chain Consensus Algorithm – Device Communication Protocols
The INT P2P architecture will use DHT to organize network nodes and will utilize both TCP/IP and UDP/IP as the basis of their communication protocols. This will allow IoT devices to be able to seamlessly integrate with the INT network, even in highly mobile or bad connection environments.
DHT networks are decentralized networks of distributed hash tables. These are used as lookup tables for key pairs so that nodes can efficiently retrieve values associated with a given key. This can be used to maintain a list of node addresses and public keys (miner nodes, super nodes, meta nodes), IoT devices and their associated keys as well as distributed file systems and peer to peer information sharing. This will be the keystone of the node network and IoT device information transfer.
TCP/IP and UDP/IP are both protocols used for sending data packets through the internet. TCP is the most commonly used protocol on the internet. The general structure for a transaction from device to node (once you know the IP of the node via the DHT) would be: the device sends a request for connection to the node, the node would acknowledge the request, the transaction would be sent to the node, the node would signal a verification that the data was received correctly, the device would signal a connection close, the connection would close.
This can also be done in the other direction, say by connecting your wallet to a node to download the block chain. As follows: the device sends a request for connection to the node, the node would acknowledge the request, the data would be sent to the device in packets, each numbered in order, the device would signal on each successful arrival of a packet the packet number it received, once all packets are sent and received with no errors, the device will signal a connection close and the connection will close.
TCP is about data transmission reliability but you can see that it does this at the expense of complexity and resource intensive checks on connection and data validity. This is very useful in many cases but causes issues when operating with highly mobile devices connecting to the network (phones, vehicles) and devices in bad connection environments.
UDP is a much more lightweight protocol, using the same data packet but throwing out all the error checking and back and forth communication out in favor of a simple, one time data bullet heading for the node. There is no check to see if it is listening or if it received it. It the node misses it, the device won’t resend it, it will just send the next packet and so on. This is best for things like live broadcasting and high volume (multiple transactions per minute) data readings where missed information isn’t a large impact.
The integration of both these protocols will allow all devices to communicate with the network and seamlessly switch between the protocols which best suits the purpose at the time.
.
In one of the latest weekly updates they also hinted at mobile ad hoc networks (MANET). MANET is a continuously self-configuring, infrastructure-less, network of mobile devices connected wirelessly. This is much more complex than the above networks where each device has a defined path to route data. In a MANET, each device must forward traffic unrelated to it’s own use and, therefore, act like a router for the devices that are connected to it. These networks may operate by themselves or be connected to the internet. They don’t specify their intentions with this area of development but it has some interesting applications in nullifying the impact of devices moving in and out of network connection by being connected to one another and storing the data of their peers or by creating a node network to allow nodes to distribute traffic automatically and other more complex networks of sensors that begin to act like an artificial intelligence. Implementing this will be a tremendous task.
submitted by Graytrain to INT_Chain [link] [comments]

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Where Is Cash App Bitcoin Wallet Address? 🔴 - YouTube

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